inquiry research TEKS talk image

Knowledge and Skills Statement

Inquiry and research: listening, speaking, reading, writing, and thinking using multiple texts. The student engages in both short-term and sustained recursive inquiry processes for a variety of purposes.

During one-on-one conferencing, have students share the questions they developed during the research process as they considered their original research question. Support students in creating strong, researchable questions that address an area of common interest, expand on current knowledge, and provide new information. Document observations of student progress as they revise their major research question to best guide their research.
 

Further Explanation

Students should recognize that they may start with one version of the question and refine or narrow its focus throughout the research process. For example, students may begin with a general question and, after initial research prompts more specific questions, focus the major research question on a more specific topic.

The major research question is the specific question that students try to answer through their research. Students may start with one version of the question and refine or narrow its focus throughout the research process. For example, students researching the subject of a nonfiction text may begin with a general question such as “Who was Andrew Jackson?” After initial research prompts more specific questions, the student may choose to modify the major research question to “How did the election of Andrew Jackson influence the cause of suffrage?”

Related 2009 Student Expectation

This student expectation is related to the following SE from the 2009 reading/language arts TEKS.

(24)  Research/Synthesizing Information. Students clarify research questions and evaluate and synthesize collected information. Students are expected to:
(A)  narrow or broaden the major research question, if necessary, based on further research and investigation; and


Research

1. Lewis, K. R., Simmons, S., & Maniotes, L. (2018). Building a culture for learner voice and choice through inquiry. Teacher Librarian, 45(4), 2427. Retrieved from https://go.galegroup.com

Summary: The guided inquiry design is presented as a strategy to improve student writing process. The target of the strategy is to provide more opportunities for students to be engaged in and motivated by the writing process. The inquiry design focuses on student choice and student voice incubated in a culture in which students are encouraged to ask questions and classroom instruction is guided by participatory dialogue.

2. Maniotes, L. K. (2019). Getting to great questions for inquiry and research. Teacher Librarian, 46(3), 17–20. Retrieved from https://go.galegroup.com

Summary: This article provides an overview on how to use guided inquiry as a means to increase students' capacity to comprehend a text. However, Guided Inquiry Design is often used as an inquiry process for research and ways to gain a deeper understanding and gain information. The article includes resources that provide additional support.