composition strand teks talk image

Knowledge and Skills Statement

Composition: listening, speaking, reading, writing, and thinking using multiple texts--genres. The student uses genre characteristics and craft to compose multiple texts that are meaningful.

Use a rubric to monitor students’ progress. This SE should be assessed both while students are dictating or composing writing and after students have completed their work.

Sample rubric:

  1. The student is unable to dictate or compose informational texts, including procedural texts. The student may not be able to stay on topic.
  2. The student is able to dictate or compose informational texts, including procedural texts, with extensive assistance and prompting by the teacher.
  3. The student is able to dictate or compose informational texts, including procedural texts, with some assistance and prompting by the teacher.
  4. The student is able to dictate or compose informational texts, including procedural texts, independently.
Informational texts are texts that present information in order to explain, clarify, and/or educate. In first grade, they could include procedural texts, magazines, newspapers, menus, nonfiction books, pamphlets, and textbooks. Students' informational writing should have a clear central idea, or focus, with supporting details, an introduction and conclusion, and an evident organizational pattern.
Procedural texts are a type of informational text that is written with the intent to explain the steps in a procedure or process (e.g., recipes, how-to guides, instruction manuals, etc.).

Related 2009 Student Expectation

This student expectation is related to the following SE from the 2009 reading/language arts TEKS.

(19)  Writing/Expository and Procedural Texts. Students write expository and procedural or work-related texts to communicate ideas and information to specific audiences for specific purposes. Students are expected to:
(A)  write brief compositions about topics of interest to the student;


Research

Graham, S., Bollinger, A., Booth Olson, C., D’Aoust, C., MacArthur, C., McCutchen, D., & Olinghouse, N. (2012). Teaching elementary school students to be effective writers: A practice guide (NCEE 2012–4058). Washington, DC: National Center for Education Evaluation and Regional Assistance, Institute of Education Sciences, U.S. Department of Education. Retrieved from https://ies.ed.gov/ncee/wwc/Docs/PracticeGuide/writing_pg_062612.pdf.

Summary: The four recommendations in the What Works Clearinghouse practice guide, "Teaching Elementary School Students to Be Effective Writers," encourage teachers to help students use writing flexibly and effectively in communicating their ideas.